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Ten reasons to study computer science

Ten reasons to study computer science

19 August, 2015

It has become difficult to imagine the world without the influence of computer technology and there are more reasons to pursue this area of study than you may think.

Expanding technology

Remember? There was a time before computers ever played a role in our lives. The exponential growth in technology has seen in the past ten years the emergence of Twitter, Facebook, smart phones, wireless communications and many other technological advances in fields such as medicine and robotics. At the current rate of growth, by 2020 the technological landscape and its influence on our daily lives will be unimaginable. Therefore, when it comes to thinking about all the potential avenues of study you could choose from, computing is always worth considering.

Computing is all around us

The digital age continues to expand with the role of computing pervading throughout almost all industries and organisational processes. Whether you work as a programmer, medical practitioner or marketer it is becoming increasingly important for you to possess, at varying levels of proficiency, some understanding of computer science. Computer science no longer stands alone; it is an ever-increasing part of countless business departments and processes, and in this digital age, even journalists are being encouraged to learn JavaScript and HTML.

An ever-expanding field

The colossal growth of computing in the past few decades offers evidence of just how unpredictable an area it is. The scope for progression is considerable to say the least and it is easy to see why so many people want to be part of such an opportunity. When you commit to studying a subject the minimum you want is to know that your future is secure. Traditionally, computer science graduates would move into programming and software engineering. However, as the influence of computing continues to grow, graduates can also expect to be offered positions in other departments.


Computer science covers a great many job roles, from pure programming positions such as .NET developers, to the opportunity to be engaged with technical change management or to project manage development cycles. Experienced professionals also benefit from possessing a great number of transferable skills. This allows for professionals to move around the computing sector, keeping their workload fresh, while simultaneously developing new and solidifying existing skills and competencies.

Rewarding career opportunities

In addition to its potential to evolve much further, computing is also a career in which there are many high-paying jobs. In the UK, the average salary for a computer science graduate who moves into software engineering is £33,000, with salaries for a software development manager rising to upwards of £60,000. As technology develops, careers that demand a significant amount of computing training will inevitably develop alongside the evolution of technology. As a result, workers will benefit from being engaged with activities that are constantly changing and refreshing; promoting job satisfaction and aiding in their personal and professional development.

A solid foundation

What works for one person will not necessarily work for someone else, and of course anyone can change their mind on what they actually want to do in their career. This is all the more reason to dedicate some of your studies to computing. The skills you learn in computing can be applied to so many other areas and enable you to constantly evolve your professional life. For example, a professional using .NET to develop applications may wish to broaden their professional skill set by moving into a more managerial position, where they will combine technical skills with softer, managerial skills.

Chances to be creative

Although there are many varying kinds of computing roles it is an industry that encourages a creative side. Whether it is bringing something new to the appearance of a program, process or application, developing and improving its function, innovation goes a long way in this field. For example, many of the world’s richest and most successful entrepreneurs have been able to combine a strong computing background with creativity. Mark Zuckerberg, the creator of Facebook, is a prime example of someone who used his strong technical foundation alongside a creative mind-set that allowed him to develop an application that billions across the world now use.

Universal significance

The increasing influence of globalisation and developments in cross-continental communications has transformed the job market, with large businesses and corporations now able to relocate much of their development work to nations where the demand for skills can be met. The emergence of global technology hubs, such as Hong Kong, South Korea and Singapore, highlights how the uptake of computing early on in schools can significantly boost the national economy and drive up living standards for the wider population. Taking computer science can also provide opportunities for travel, as professionals with these particular skills are sought out across the globe, offering candidates the freedom to live and work in a country of their choosing.

Problem-solving skills

Studying computing and the logic of a variety of coding languages and processes enables you to advance the way that you think and relate to the world.

Make a difference

Finally, studying computing can take you down a number of different paths and many of these allow you to have a positive impact on lives in general. Computer technology is heavily connected to the medical field, education, entertainment, architecture and even in security, so the opportunity to ultimately use your computer studies to bring something good to people are vast.


NCC Education offers universally-recognised, quality British computing qualifications. Go to our website: and find out how you can enrol at your local centres and take your first steps on your journey to a successful career in computing.

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